Condition of John Kerry’s wife improves

Condition of John Kerry’s wife improves

John Kerry is pictured with his wife Teresa Heinz-Kerry after being sworn-in as U.S. Secretary of State by U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (not pictured) during a ceremony at the State Department in Washington, February 6, 2013. Photo: Reuters/Jason Reed

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The health of Teresa Heinz Kerry, the wife of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, continues to improve and doctors have ruled out a heart attack, stroke or brain tumor as causing her “seizure-like” symptoms, the State Department said on Tuesday.

Kerry will travel briefly to Washington on Tuesday to open this week’s U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue meetings, Glen Johnson, a State Department official who is his personal spokesman, said in a statement released by the department.

Heinz Kerry, 74, was taken a hospital on the Massachusetts island of Nantucket on Sunday and then flown in her own plane to be treated at Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital, where she remains.

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