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Fan grabs 4 foul balls at Indians game

Fan grabs 4 foul balls at Indians game

Cleveland Indians relief pitcher C.C. Lee delivers in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Sunday, July 14, 2013, in Cleveland. The Indians won 6-4. Photo: Associated Press/Tony Dejak

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Cleveland Indians say a lucky fan at Sunday’s game caught four foul balls, a once-in-several-lifetimes achievement.

The team said Greg Van Niel, a season-ticket holder, hauled in four souvenir balls during the Indians’ 6-4 win over the Kansas City Royals. Van Niel said he wasn’t sitting in his usual seats, but he was able to catch three balls and that one was a “pick-up” he tossed to another fan. Van Niel said he planned to give the three other balls to kids that were part of his group.

Van Niel posed for a picture holding three of the souvenirs for the Indians. He said he had never caught a foul ball before his amazing one-day haul.

There were 15,431 other fans at the Indians’ final game before the All-Star break, but it’s safe to bet none had a day quite like Van Niel.

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